#ProjectOnline custom #email notifications using #MSFlow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #MSProject #Exchange #Office365 #PowerPlatform Part 2

April 30, 2019 at 8:22 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, App, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Workflow | Leave a comment
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Following on from my last post on email notifications using Microsoft Flow, this post looks at further examples. Part 1 can be found here: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/18/projectonline-custom-email-notifications-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-msproject-exchange-office365-powerplatform-part-1/

In case you missed it, I also published a video last week with a simple example Flow to send the project owner an email on project creation: https://youtu.be/CCdxUqBrhEA

In part 2 we will look another example email notification to email each resource the projects they are assigned to for the coming week. The Flow can be seen below:

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This is triggered on schedule as seen below, update as needed:

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The Flow then gets some date time values using the Date Time actions for the current date time and a future date time:

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The Flow then fires off an HTTP request to SharePoint to get a list of resources with email addresses from the Project Online Odata Reporting API:

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Then using an Apply to each action we send an email to the assigned resources. Firstly we pass in the output from the previous step, which is:

body(‘GetAllResourcesWithEmailAddresses’)[‘value’]

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Then inside the loop we perform another HTTP call to SharePoint, this time to get the resource’s assignments for the week by querying the Project Online Odata Reporting API as seen below:

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Here we are passing in 3 variables to the Odata query:

  • ResourceId which is the following expression added in: items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ResourceId’]
  • Current time and Future time to filter the data returned from the time phased resource demand endpoint to this week, these are the outputs from the previous date time actions:

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The Flow then creates an HTML table from the data returned from the previous action:

body(‘GetAllResourceAssignments’)[‘value’]

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Then the final action in the Flow is to send an email:

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The To value is an expression: items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ResourceEmailAddress’]

Update the email body as needed and include the output from Create HTML table action.

This will result in an email being sent to all resources in Project Online with email addresses containing their weekly assignments detailing the projects that they are working on, here is an example email:

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Another example that demonstrates how easily custom email notifications can be created for Project Online using Microsoft Flow.

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#ProjectOnline custom #email notifications using #MSFlow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #MSProject #Exchange #Office365 #PowerPlatform Part 1

March 18, 2019 at 9:26 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, App, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Workflow | 1 Comment
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This blogs post has been delayed due to all of my blog posts on Microsoft’s new Roadmap service – summary post here with most of the posts: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/01/project-roadmap-cds-app-overview-ppm-projectmanagement-msproject-projectonline-office365-powerplatfom-dynamics365/

This post continues the series of posts I started to do in December 2018 following on from a Microsoft Tech Sync session where I presented a session on Project Online and Flow better together. As it’s been a while, here are links to the previous posts:

Post 1: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/06/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-1/

Post 2: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-2/

Post 3: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/14/projectonline-snapshot-data-to-sharepoint-list-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform/

In this post we take a look at an option for building custom email notifications with a no code / low code solutions using Microsoft Flow. This example sends an email for projects that are running late. There are two simple versions for this, one with a details table in the email and one with just the project name but includes hyperlinks in the email to the project detail page. These are both very similar, the first one can be seen below:

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This is triggered on the Recurrence trigger, set based on your requirement. This then uses the Sent an HTTP request to SharePoint action to query the Project Online OData Reporting API:

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This will control the data that is included in the email, so this OData query can be updated based on your requirements. Next the Flow uses the Create an HTML table action:

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For this action we pass in the project data array from the previous action using a custom expression:

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The final action is to send the email:

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In the body of the email here we are just using the output from the previous Create HTML table action:

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This results in an email being sent with the data from the OData query used (these are just my test projects and not real projects!):

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Very simple! Sticking with the same theme for late projects but this time the email contains hyperlinks into the projects, this Flow is slightly different:

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The difference here is we do not use the Create HTML table action but instead use Select and Join from the Data Operations actions. Firstly the select actions looks like this:

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The Select action is used to transform the data in the results array from the previous step. Just the same as the Create HTML table in the first example, we pass in the project data array value from the previous action into the From property. Then the Select action was changed to use the text mode using the toggle option outlined in red below:

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In Map properties, transform the data as needed in the email such as:

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Here we are building up a URL passing in the ProjectId for the PDP URL (update to the correct PDP) and the ProjectName for the URL title. Then we use the Join Data Operations action to put each project on a new row in the email:

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The From property is just using the Output from the previous Select action:

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Then the final action is the email:

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Note the Is HTML property is set to Yes. In the Body we type the email body as required plus the Output from the previous Join action:

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Then the email is sent on the defined schedule with clickable links to the Project Detail Pages (again, these are just my test projects and not real live projects!):

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These are two simple examples but as you can see, it’s very easy to build Project Online related emails using Microsoft Flow. I have some more examples in my next posts coming soon.

#ProjectOnline Snapshot / data to #SharePoint list using #MSFLow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #Office365 #PowerPlatform

December 14, 2018 at 10:00 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Reporting, Workflow | 2 Comments
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Next in my series of posts on using Microsoft Flow with Project Online is capturing Project Online data into a SharePoint list, this is a useful scenario for simple snapshot requirements. For example, if you want to snapshot some key project level data, the easiest place to store this data is in a SharePoint list. I have blogged simple code examples before that do this: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2016/08/26/projectonline-data-capture-snapshot-capability-with-powershell-sharepoint-office365-ppm-bi/ & https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/01/27/projectonline-project-level-html-fields-to-a-sharepoint-list-powershell-ppm-office365/ Whilst these approaches work, the PowerShell does need to be run from somewhere, a server / Azure Function etc. This post provides the same end result with Project Online data in a SharePoint list but all from a Microsoft Flow. The Flow can be seen below:

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This simple example makes use of the recurrence trigger to schedule the process, the “Send an HTTP Request to SharePoint” action to get the project data from Project Online and a SharePoint create item action inside an Apply to each loop. We will walkthrough the actions later in the post.

Firstly, the SharePoint list was created:

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This was created in my Project Online Project Web App site collection. I created SharePoint columns on this list for each of the fields I wanted to capture from my Project Online dataset. As this is just an example, the number of fields and data is quite limited. Now back to the Flow. We will skip over the recurrence trigger to the first action that gets the Project Online data, this just uses the “Send an HTTP Request to SharePoint” action to call the Project Online OData REST API so that we can easily get all of the Project Online data. In this example we are accessing the Projects endpoint in this API and selecting a few example project level fields including an example custom field:

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This action will get all of the data based on the Odata query used in the Uri input. We wont cover all of the settings here in this post as I covered this in the last post found here: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-2/

Next we need to loop through all of the projects in the results array to create a SharePoint list item for each project. To do this we need to use an “Apply to each” action:

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In the output from the previous step we use body(‘ReadallProjects’)[‘value’] to use the data from the previous step which is all of our Project Online projects with some data minus the timesheet project in this example. Then for each project in the array we create a list item on our target SharePoint list using the create item action. In the create item action we just map the data from the array to the correct list column. The Project Online fields are accessed using an expression, for example for ProjectCost in this example Flow the expression is items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectCost’] where apply to each is the name of the action and ProjectCost is the field / property in the results from the Odata query.

Once this Flow runs a few times you can then easily create snapshot / trend reports or even extend the SharePoint view to show what you need:

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As you can see in this example, I’ve updated the SharePoint view to show the RAG icon in the Overall RAG column rather than the text value. This is very simple with the column formatting options available with the SharePoint modern UI using JSON.

Another example of extending Project Online with low / no code solutions in Office 365.

There will be further example solutions built for Project Online using Microsoft Flow in later posts.

#ProjectOnline Publish all projects using #MSFLow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #Office365 #PowerPlatform part 2

December 12, 2018 at 9:00 pm | Posted in Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Workflow | 4 Comments
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Following on from my first blog post on Publishing all projects in Project Online using Microsoft Flow, here is the 2nd post. For those that missed the 1st part, it can be found here: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/06/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-1/

In this post we will look at achieving the same publish all functionality but using different actions than we used in the last example. Previously we used the actions available with the Project Online connector, in this example we do not use the Project Online connector when accessing Project Online. The Project Online connector actions used previously to get the projects, check the projects out and then publish and check in the projects have been replaced with a SharePoint action where we can call the Project Online REST APIs. This is to show another example of working with Project Online using Flow. This approach does require an understanding of the Project Online REST APIs but this approach offers so much more capability for Project Online when using Microsoft Flow. The Flow can be seen below:

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The difference between this Publish all flow and the example from part 1 is that we have replaced all of the Project Online connector native actions with the SharePoint “Send an HTTP Request to SharePoint” action and removed the Filter action as that is not required now. The “Send an HTTP Request to SharePoint” action can be used to work with the Project Online REST CSOM API and the Odata Reporting API directly from Microsoft Flow – this opens up so many more options for working with Project Online using Flow! This Flow assumes you have set up the connection for SharePoint Online using an account that has publish access to all projects and access to the Odata Reporting API in Project Online. This example is still triggered using the schedule action so I wont cover that part. Once triggered, the first action is to get all of the Project Online projects:

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Enter the Project Online PWA site URL in the Site Address, select the HTTP Method – GET in this case. Then add the Uri, in this case we are using the Odata API to return all project Id’s and filter out the timesheet project but this could be updated to select only projects based on your logic such as projects with a certain custom field value or projects not published in a certain number of days / weeks etc. Then add the HTTP headers as seen. This action will get all of the projects based on the Odata query. Next we need to loop through all of the projects in the array to check them out, publish them then check them back in. To do this we need to use an “Apply to each” action:

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In the output from the previous step we use body(‘Send_an_HTTP_request_to_SharePoint_-_get_projects’)[‘value’] to use the data from the previous step which is all of our Project Online projects minus the timesheet project in this example. Then for each project in the array we check out the project using another “Send an HTTP request to SharePoint” action:

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This time the HTTP Method is a POST and the Uri is set to use the REST CSOM API to check out the project. We pass in the ProjectId from the current item in the array using items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectId’]

The final action is to publish the project and check it in, this is done using another “Send an HTTP request to SharePoint” action:

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The HTTP Method is a POST and the Uri is set to use the REST CSOM API to publish the project and check it in – the check in is performed using the true parameter. We pass in the ProjectId from the current item in the array using items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectId’]

The final variation of this publish all example is only very slightly different, the only difference is that it is manually triggered rather than on a schedule. We have removed the schedule action and replaced it with a SharePoint trigger to trigger when an item is created on a list:

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I have a list on my PWA site that only PWA admins can access, here an admin user creates a new item, this then triggers the publish all flow:

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We then have a history of who triggered the publish all jobs and when.

This post will hopefully give you some ideas on how Microsoft Flow can now really compliment Project Online and offer some scenarios for low / no code customisations.

In the next post we will look at more examples for building low / no code solutions for Project Online using Microsoft Flow.

#ProjectOnline Publish all projects using #MSFLow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #Office365 #PowerPlatform part 1

December 6, 2018 at 12:00 am | Posted in Add-on, Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Performance, Reporting, Workflow | 1 Comment
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I recently had the opportunity to present at a Microsoft Tech Sync session where I presented a session on Project Online and Flow. During this session gave examples of how Microsoft Flow compliments Project Online by enabling no / low code solutions to extend the Project Online features. I plan to do several blog posts over the next month or so where I will share some of these Microsoft Flows. Hopefully this will give you some ideas of how Microsoft Flow can be used to simplify some of those customisations for Project Online.

The first Flow example I want to share with you is a publish all projects flow. I have published examples before for Project Server and Project Online as found here:

These all required a basic understanding of the Project Server / Project Online APIs and somewhere to run the code from – I thought this would be a good example to move over to a Microsoft Flow. In this blog post I will walkthrough the first example I have for publishing all projects as seen here:

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This is built using only actions from the Project Online connector in Flow – so there is no need to understand the Project Online APIs! This Flow assumes you have setup the connection to Project Online using an account that has publish access to all projects. This Flow is triggered using a schedule as seen here:

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When this Flow is triggered, the first action is to get all the Project Online projects using the List Projects action:

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All you need to do is provide the PWA site URL. This List Projects action also includes project templates so these need to be filtered out, to do this we filter the results returned from the List Projects action using a Filter Array action:

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In the From field we enter body(‘List_projects’)[‘value’] to get the data from the previous action, which in this case is the List projects action. In the filter we use item()[‘ProjectType’] is not equal to 1, Project Type 1 being the Project Templates. In advanced edit mode it looks like this:

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Next we need to loop through all of the projects in the array to check them out, publish them then check them back in. To do this we need to use an Apply to each action:

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In the output from the previous step we use body(‘Filter_array’) to use the data from the previous step which is all of our Project Online projects minus the project templates. Then for each project in the array we check out the project using the default Checkout project action:

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Enter the Project Online PWA URL then in the Project Id property pass in the Project ID from the current item in the array using items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘Id’]

The final action is to publish the project and check it in, this is done using the default Checkin and publish project action:

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Enter the Project Online PWA URL then in the Project Id property pass in the Project ID from the current item in the array using items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘Id’]

That is it, when this flow executes it will publish all of your Project Online projects. A simple no code serverless solution!

In part 2 we will look at two other variations for publishing all projects in Office 365 Project Online using Microsoft Flow.

#ProjectOnline reporting on task Predecessors and Successors #O365 #MSProject #PPM #PMOT # Excel #PowerBI #OData

October 13, 2018 at 9:23 am | Posted in Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Fixes, Functionality, Information, Reporting | 3 Comments
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A few times I have heard this topic come up so I thought it was worth a quick blog post to give two examples for getting access to this detail. Firstly a quick look at my sample project to see the data and task links:

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As we can see, all tasks are linked. The predecessor and successor details are not available in the OData reporting API by default: ({PWASiteURL}/_api/ProjectData).

The first option we will explore is using the REST CSOM API ({PWAURL}/_api/ProjectServer). To access this is not a simple read from one endpoint like it would be in the OData reporting API if the data was there. When using the CSOM REST API you have to first get the project then from there you can get the task details and task link details. Below we walkthrough this process and view the results. I am just using the browser to return the data for ease. Let’s have a look at this Project data using: {PWASiteURL}/_api/ProjectServer/Projects(‘a28bf087-2acb-e811-afb0-00155d143a0e’) where the GUID is the project GUID for the project seen above. This returns:

SNAGHTML1271759a

Here you can see all of the related endpoints and then the project properties below. I have outlined in red the two related endpoints that are useful to us, the TaskLinks and Tasks.

Lets have a look at the TaskLinks first – we have 4 links in the simple plan displayed above, this matches what we see in the TaskLinks endpoint:

{PWASiteUrl}/_api/ProjectServer/Projects(‘a28bf087-2acb-e811-afb0-00155d143a0e’)/TaskLinks

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For each link we can then access two other endpoints /End and /Start and see two properties for the link, Id and DependencyType. Id is the TaskLink Id and DependencyType is the internal dependency type value, the enumerations for the dependency type can be found here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.projectserver.client.dependencytype_di_pj14mref.aspx. Looking at the data returned, I have 3 links with a dependency type of 1 (Finish to Start) and 1 link with a dependency type of 3 (Start to Start). Now for one of those TaskLinks, we will look at what the /End and /Start endpoints provide. I will use the TaskLink with a Start to Start dependency type for this. Firstly the /Start endpoint:

{PWASiteUL}/_api/ProjectServer/Projects(‘a28bf087-2acb-e811-afb0-00155d143a0e’)/TaskLinks(‘0d7da2b3-2dcb-e811-9328-1002b5489337’)/Start – where the 2nd GUID is the TaskLink GUID

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This returns all of the data for the starting task, in this example it is task T2 (I’ve updated the REST call to just return the task name:

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Task T2 is the task starting the link as seen in the project plan:

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The /End endpoint, as you can guess will return the same details but for the task ending the link:

{PWASiteUL}/_api/ProjectServer/Projects(‘a28bf087-2acb-e811-afb0-00155d143a0e’)/TaskLinks(‘0d7da2b3-2dcb-e811-9328-1002b5489337’)/End – where the 2nd GUID is the TaskLink GUID – I’ve update the REST call to just return the task name:

SNAGHTML128b4ce6

This returns T3 from the example project:

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As you can see, using the TaskLinks endpoint once we have the project, we can then navigate to find the task details for the linked tasks.

Now lets look at what the /Tasks endpoint can do for us to find the linked tasks. Accessing the {PWASiteUrl}/_api/ProjectServer/Projects(‘a28bf087-2acb-e811-afb0-00155d143a0e’)/Tasks endpoint will return all of the tasks in the project (based on the project GUID used in the REST call):

SNAGHTML128ffcaa

For each task in the project we can see the task properties but also navigate to another endpoint to view more related data for that one task. For example, we can then navigate and view the /Predecessors and /Successors. I will use task T3 for this walkthrough by passing in the Task GUID for T3. Accessing the predecessors data for task T3:

{PWASiteUrl}/_api/ProjectServer/Projects(‘a28bf087-2acb-e811-afb0-00155d143a0e’)/Tasks(‘b3433ba7-2dcb-e811-9328-1002b5489337’)/Predecessors – where I have passed in the task GUID for T3:

SNAGHTML12964d6d

This returns the TaskLink details for the predecessor task – from that point we can then use the /End and /Start related queries to get the linked task details. The same goes for the /Successors endpoint for the example task T3:

{PWASiteUrl}/_api/ProjectServer/Projects(‘a28bf087-2acb-e811-afb0-00155d143a0e’)/Tasks(‘b3433ba7-2dcb-e811-9328-1002b5489337’)/Successors – where I have passed in the task GUID for T3:

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This returns the TaskLink details for the successor task – from that point we can then use the /End and /Start related queries to get the linked task details.

As you can see, trying the get that data for all linked tasks in a report using Power Query wouldn’t be a simple query to one endpoint but it is possible to follow it through to get the data needed.

The next option to look at is creating two task level calculated fields so that you can get the predecessor and successor details in the /Tasks endpoint in the OData reporting API ({PWASiteURL}/_api/ProjectData/Tasks). Whilst this is simplifies the reporting experience there is a performance cost to this – certainly for large projects with many tasks. Also this will use 2 of the recommended maximum 5 task level calculated fields! In PWA Settings > Enterprise Custom Fields and Lookup Tables, create two new Task level text fields that use formulas, one field will be for predecessors and one for successors. In the predecessors field formula use [Predecessors] and in the successors field formula use [Successors]. The predecessors custom field can be seen below:

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The next time you publish your project/s you will then see the data available in the OData Reporting API:

{PWASiteUrl}/_api/ProjectData/Projects(guid’a28bf087-2acb-e811-afb0-00155d143a0e’)/Tasks?$Select=TaskName,TaskPredecessors,TaskSuccessors

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Hope that helps!

#ProjectOnline #MSProject #Agile updates #Kanban #Scrum #Tasks #PPM #PMOT

March 27, 2018 at 6:48 am | Posted in Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information | Comments Off on #ProjectOnline #MSProject #Agile updates #Kanban #Scrum #Tasks #PPM #PMOT
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There are some updates / improvements to the Agile feature in Project Online Desktop client, these follow on from the first release in October last year: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2017/10/25/agile-now-available-in-msproject-kanban-scrum-sprints-tasks/ 

These updates are available in the latest release of the Office Insider version of the Office click-to-run client.

Two new features in this release for updating the % complete on boards as you move tasks between a status and the ability to filter tasks on the boards using the summary tasks and resources. These are seen below.

% complete on boards

Opening a board view such as the Backlog Board or the Current Sprint Board you will now see a “Set % Complete” row. As seen on the screenshot below this can also be hidden from the view:

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Clicking the “Set % Complete” enables you to type the desired % complete for that status:

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As you move a task into that status column, the task % complete will update as per the % complete value for the column:

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Filters

On the board views you have the ability to filter tasks using the summary tasks and resources:

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You can select multiple values from the two filter menus, the tasks will then filter on the board based on your filters:

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The filters are not persistent, as you change views the filters will be reset.

A great addition to the agile feature in Project Online Desktop client. If you’re on the Insider version of Office click-to-run, take a look and see what you think.

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