#ProjectOnline custom #email notifications using #MSFlow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #MSProject #Exchange #Office365 #PowerPlatform Part 1

March 18, 2019 at 9:26 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, App, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Workflow | Leave a comment
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This blogs post has been delayed due to all of my blog posts on Microsoft’s new Roadmap service – summary post here with most of the posts: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2019/03/01/project-roadmap-cds-app-overview-ppm-projectmanagement-msproject-projectonline-office365-powerplatfom-dynamics365/

This post continues the series of posts I started to do in December 2018 following on from a Microsoft Tech Sync session where I presented a session on Project Online and Flow better together. As it’s been a while, here are links to the previous posts:

Post 1: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/06/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-1/

Post 2: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-2/

Post 3: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/14/projectonline-snapshot-data-to-sharepoint-list-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform/

In this post we take a look at an option for building custom email notifications with a no code / low code solutions using Microsoft Flow. This example sends an email for projects that are running late. There are two simple versions for this, one with a details table in the email and one with just the project name but includes hyperlinks in the email to the project detail page. These are both very similar, the first one can be seen below:

image

This is triggered on the Recurrence trigger, set based on your requirement. This then uses the Sent an HTTP request to SharePoint action to query the Project Online OData Reporting API:

image

This will control the data that is included in the email, so this OData query can be updated based on your requirements. Next the Flow uses the Create an HTML table action:

image

For this action we pass in the project data array from the previous action using a custom expression:

image

The final action is to send the email:

image

In the body of the email here we are just using the output from the previous Create HTML table action:

image

This results in an email being sent with the data from the OData query used (these are just my test projects and not real projects!):

image

Very simple! Sticking with the same theme for late projects but this time the email contains hyperlinks into the projects, this Flow is slightly different:

image

The difference here is we do not use the Create HTML table action but instead use Select and Join from the Data Operations actions. Firstly the select actions looks like this:

image

The Select action is used to transform the data in the results array from the previous step. Just the same as the Create HTML table in the first example, we pass in the project data array value from the previous action into the From property. Then the Select action was changed to use the text mode using the toggle option outlined in red below:

image

In Map properties, transform the data as needed in the email such as:

image

Here we are building up a URL passing in the ProjectId for the PDP URL (update to the correct PDP) and the ProjectName for the URL title. Then we use the Join Data Operations action to put each project on a new row in the email:

image

The From property is just using the Output from the previous Select action:

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Then the final action is the email:

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Note the Is HTML property is set to Yes. In the Body we type the email body as required plus the Output from the previous Join action:

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Then the email is sent on the defined schedule with clickable links to the Project Detail Pages (again, these are just my test projects and not real live projects!):

image

These are two simple examples but as you can see, it’s very easy to build Project Online related emails using Microsoft Flow. I have some more examples in my next posts coming soon.

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#ProjectOnline Snapshot / data to #SharePoint list using #MSFLow #MicrosoftFlow #PPM #PMOT #Office365 #PowerPlatform

December 14, 2018 at 10:00 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Reporting, Workflow | 2 Comments
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Next in my series of posts on using Microsoft Flow with Project Online is capturing Project Online data into a SharePoint list, this is a useful scenario for simple snapshot requirements. For example, if you want to snapshot some key project level data, the easiest place to store this data is in a SharePoint list. I have blogged simple code examples before that do this: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2016/08/26/projectonline-data-capture-snapshot-capability-with-powershell-sharepoint-office365-ppm-bi/ & https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/01/27/projectonline-project-level-html-fields-to-a-sharepoint-list-powershell-ppm-office365/ Whilst these approaches work, the PowerShell does need to be run from somewhere, a server / Azure Function etc. This post provides the same end result with Project Online data in a SharePoint list but all from a Microsoft Flow. The Flow can be seen below:

image

This simple example makes use of the recurrence trigger to schedule the process, the “Send an HTTP Request to SharePoint” action to get the project data from Project Online and a SharePoint create item action inside an Apply to each loop. We will walkthrough the actions later in the post.

Firstly, the SharePoint list was created:

image

This was created in my Project Online Project Web App site collection. I created SharePoint columns on this list for each of the fields I wanted to capture from my Project Online dataset. As this is just an example, the number of fields and data is quite limited. Now back to the Flow. We will skip over the recurrence trigger to the first action that gets the Project Online data, this just uses the “Send an HTTP Request to SharePoint” action to call the Project Online OData REST API so that we can easily get all of the Project Online data. In this example we are accessing the Projects endpoint in this API and selecting a few example project level fields including an example custom field:

image

This action will get all of the data based on the Odata query used in the Uri input. We wont cover all of the settings here in this post as I covered this in the last post found here: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/projectonline-publish-all-projects-using-msflow-microsoftflow-ppm-pmot-office365-powerplatform-part-2/

Next we need to loop through all of the projects in the results array to create a SharePoint list item for each project. To do this we need to use an “Apply to each” action:

image

In the output from the previous step we use body(‘ReadallProjects’)[‘value’] to use the data from the previous step which is all of our Project Online projects with some data minus the timesheet project in this example. Then for each project in the array we create a list item on our target SharePoint list using the create item action. In the create item action we just map the data from the array to the correct list column. The Project Online fields are accessed using an expression, for example for ProjectCost in this example Flow the expression is items(‘Apply_to_each’)[‘ProjectCost’] where apply to each is the name of the action and ProjectCost is the field / property in the results from the Odata query.

Once this Flow runs a few times you can then easily create snapshot / trend reports or even extend the SharePoint view to show what you need:

image

As you can see in this example, I’ve updated the SharePoint view to show the RAG icon in the Overall RAG column rather than the text value. This is very simple with the column formatting options available with the SharePoint modern UI using JSON.

Another example of extending Project Online with low / no code solutions in Office 365.

There will be further example solutions built for Project Online using Microsoft Flow in later posts.

Change required for #SharePoint Online / #ProjectOnline REST API calls when using WebRequest #PowerShell #dotnet #office365dev

May 9, 2018 at 7:00 am | Posted in .Net, Administration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Issue, PowerShell | 2 Comments
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Just a quick blog post to highlight a change the is required when querying Project Online / SharePoint Online REST APIs in code when using the WebRequest class. Previously the PowerShell code sample below would work and authenticate with no issues:

#add SharePoint Online DLL - update the location if required
$programFiles = [environment]::getfolderpath("programfiles")
add-type -Path $programFiles'\SharePoint Online Management Shell\Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.PowerShell\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.dll'

#set the environment details
$PWAInstanceURL = "https://PWAURL"
$username = "username" 
$password = "password"
$securePass = ConvertTo-SecureString $password -AsPlainText -Force

#set the Odata URL with the correct project fields needed,
$url = $PWAInstanceURL + "/_api/ProjectData/Projects()?`$Filter=ProjectType ne 7&`$Select=ProjectId,ProjectName,ProjectPercentCompleted,ProjectOwnerName"

#get all of the data from the OData URL
[Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.SharePointOnlineCredentials]$spocreds = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.SharePointOnlineCredentials($username, $securePass)  
$webrequest = [System.Net.WebRequest]::Create($url)
$webrequest.Credentials = $spocreds
$webrequest.Accept = "application/json;odata=verbose"
$webrequest.Headers.Add("X-FORMS_BASED_AUTH_ACCEPTED", "f")
$response = $webrequest.GetResponse()
$reader = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader $response.GetResponseStream()
$data = $reader.ReadToEnd()
$results = ConvertFrom-Json -InputObject $data
$results.d.results 

There has been a change in Office365 and this would now generate a 401 unauthorized error as seen below:

image

It is now required to use the authentication cookie, not sure if this is a permanent change or a temporary issue. Adding the line below resolves the issue:

$webrequest.Headers["Cookie"] = $spocreds.GetAuthenticationCookie($url)

#get all of the data from the OData URL
[Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.SharePointOnlineCredentials]$spocreds = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.SharePointOnlineCredentials($username, $securePass)  
$webrequest = [System.Net.WebRequest]::Create($url)
$webrequest.Credentials = $spocreds
$webrequest.Accept = "application/json;odata=verbose"
$webrequest.Headers["Cookie"] = $spocreds.GetAuthenticationCookie($url)
$webrequest.Headers.Add("X-FORMS_BASED_AUTH_ACCEPTED", "f")
$response = $webrequest.GetResponse()

This change would be applicable to all of my PowerShell code samples that query the Project Online OData API found here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/site/search?f%5B0%5D.Type=User&f%5B0%5D.Value=PWMather&sortBy=Date

Hope that helps

#ProjectOnline #PowerShell to keep #PPM data in sync on #SharePoint list #PMOT #O365

March 1, 2018 at 1:38 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, App, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information | 1 Comment
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Following on from my two PowerApps posts on creating an example Project Online PowerApps app, I thought I would publish the example PowerShell script that I used to populate and update my SharePoint list in the Project Web App site collection. For those that missed my Project Online PowerApps posts, please find the links below:

https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/02/21/projectonline-powerapps-example-office365-ppm-pmot-apps-msproject-part1/

https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/02/24/projectonline-powerapps-example-office365-ppm-pmot-apps-msproject-sharepoint-part2/

The script sample can be downloaded from the Microsoft Script Gallery here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Keep-Online-data-in-sync-06a1bf8d

This PowerShell script will use the Project Reporting OData API to get all of the published projects in the Project Online PWA Site Collection, then for each project it will then create or update a list item on the specified SharePoint list. If the project has already been created on the SharePoint list on a previous run, the items will be updated rather than creating a new item.The user setting up the script will need to make some changes to the script, this is covered in the blog post.

The account used will need access to the OData API in PWA and contribute access to the target SharePoint list. The SharePoint list will also need to be created beforehand with the required columns.

To get the script to work you will need to reference the DLL as seen in the image below:

image

This can be installed from the SharePoint Online Client components / management shell. I used the dll from the SharePoint Online Management Shell in this example.

Firstly decide what project level fields you want to include in your PowerApp / SharePoint list, this will determine the list column requirements. Then create the SharePoint list in the PWA site collection with the required columns, for this example I created a list called ProjectData with the columns below:

image

Title is used for my Project Names in this example. You will then need to update the list item update / creation part of the sample script to map to the correct SharePoint column names you created and the project fields:

image

Also ensure the variables have been updated correctly, placeholder values seen below:

image

Save and run the PowerShell script (fully test on a non-production PWA site collection before Production) to ensure the data is captured correctly in the target SharePoint list. This script could be run manually on demand or on schedule using a scheduled task if running on a server or a scheduled Azure Function or other methods. This script could also be updated to work based on the project publish event using a combination of Flow / Logic App and an Azure Function based on previous examples I have blogged: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2017/08/01/running-projectonline-powershell-in-azure-using-azurefunctions-ppm-cloud-flow-logicapp-part2/

Whilst the purpose of this script was to enable us to get the data into a SharePoint list and keep the data in sync for our PowerApp, it can be used for other purposes. For example, you could use this example script to modified the last script I published for HTLM fields to update existing items rather than creating new items each run. Do keep in mind that this SharePoint list would not be security trimmed like a Project Center view though, so you might want to restrict access to the SharePoint list depending on your data / security policies for your PPM data.

The script is provided "As is" with no warranties etc.

#ProjectOnline #PowerApps example #Office365 #PPM #PMOT #Apps #MSProject #SharePoint Part2

February 24, 2018 at 10:17 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, App, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Mobile | 2 Comments
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In part 2 of this series we look at continuing with the example PowerApp for Project Online for project details and project navigation. For those of you that missed part 1, a link to the post can be found below:

https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/02/21/projectonline-powerapps-example-office365-ppm-pmot-apps-msproject-part1/

In part 2 we will update the detail screen to display the data we want and include links to PWA for the associated project. If you are following, open the app you started in part 1:

image

Using the tree view on the left, click DetailScreen1 to load the detail screen or click the chevron next to a project from the browse screen:

SNAGHTMLad72abf

Firstly I updated the screen label to “Project Details” and deleted the delete and edit icons:

SNAGHTMLadf40c1

Next two buttons were added to the top bar, one for the Site and one for the Tasks. The Site button will launch DataCardValue8 which in my case is the Project Site URL as seen below:

SNAGHTMLaf5ceae

The Tasks button will launch the Project Schedule PDP but concatenating the PWA URL for the schedule PDP (or whatever PDP you want to link to) then using the ProjectID, in my case DataCardValue2, from the detail screen for the projuid URL parameter:

SNAGHTMLafa7b75

The buttons were added to the screen using the insert menu:

image

As you can see, there are lots of options on the insert ribbon! Other quick links could easily be added such as Issues, Risks, New Risk etc. That is it for the detail view, we have some project details and two buttons that link out to PWA for the associated project:

SNAGHTMLb051b8d

Just for fun I also added a new screen in for a chart. I inserted a bar chart and created a project count by progress chart:

image

For the Items, I entered the following formula to count the number of projects Completed, Not Starter or In Progress:

image

The formula is below for my data, ProjectData is the name of my SharePoint list and Progress is the column on my SharePoint list that contains the % complete value for each project:

Table(
    {Column: "Completed", Value: CountIf(ProjectData, Progress = 100)
    },
    {Column: "Not Started", Value: CountIf(ProjectData, Progress = 0)
    },
    {Column: "In Progress", Value: CountIf(ProjectData, Progress <> 0 && Progress <> 100)
    }
)

Then set the item colours:

image

I then added the back arrow to navigate back to the main browse screen:

image

The final change was to add an icon to the main browse screen that enabled navigation to the chart screen:

image

To preview your app in PowerApps, press F5:

Main screen: list of projects with search and sort using project name, link for each project to project detail screen, access to chart screen, refresh the data and link to create a new project in Project Online

image

Details screen: project details with button links to the project site or schedule PDP in Project Online PWA and a back button to the main screen

SNAGHTMLb7913d8

Chart screen: bar chart display project count by progress for Completed, Not Started and In Progress with a back button to the main screen

image

Once you are happy with your app you can share it to your organisation. Before you do, access the App Settings view and give it a name, set the icon and description:

image 

Then click Save and save it to your organisations PowerApps environment then share the app:

SNAGHTMLb8e0f8c

For details on Saving, publishing and sharing your apps see the links here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powerapps/save-publish-app & https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powerapps/share-app Users can then access your app using the browser, PowerApps Studio or the PowerApps mobile app!

Hopefully that has given you enough to get started or given you some ideas for Project Online PowerApps. There are so many features to PowerApps, they are very powerful! For getting started guides on PowerApps start here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powerapps/getting-started

Have fun!

#ProjectOnline Project level #HTML fields to a #SharePoint list #PowerShell #PPM #Office365

January 27, 2018 at 10:01 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, PowerShell, Reporting | 2 Comments
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Following on from my previous mini series of posts for including the HTML formatting in Project Online Power BI reports, this post is a supporting blog post for the PowerShell script I used in the 3rd post. For those that missed that mini series of posts, the links are below:

Part 1: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/01/01/projectonline-powerbi-report-include-html-formatting-ppm-pmot-powerquery-odata-rest-part-1/

Part 2: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/01/03/projectonline-powerbi-report-include-html-formatting-ppm-pmot-powerquery-odata-rest-part-2/

Part 3: https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/01/16/projectonline-powerbi-report-include-html-formatting-ppm-pmot-powerquery-odata-rest-part-3/

This blog post is the supporting blog post for the script sample published to the Microsoft Script Gallery: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Online-Level-HTML-fields-5dc31a38

This PowerShell script will use the Project Reporting OData API to get all of the published projects in the Project Online PWA Site Collection, then for each project it will get the project level multiple lines of text fields that include the HTML from the REST API and then create a list item on the specified SharePoint list. The user setting up the script will need to make some changes to the script , this is covered in the blog post.

The account used will need access to the OData API in PWA, at least full read access to all projects and contribute access to the target SharePoint list. The SharePoint list will also need to be created beforehand with the required columns.

To get the script to work you will need to reference the DLL as seen in the image below:

image

This can be installed from the SharePoint Online Client components / management shell. I used the dll from the SharePoint Online Management Shell in this example.

Firstly decide what project level multiple lines of text fields you want to include, this will determine the list column requirements. Then create the SharePoint list in the PWA site collection with the required columns, for this example I created a list called ProjectMutliLineFields with the columns below:

image

I used the default Title field for the Project Name, ProjectId for the Project GUID then I created four multiple lines of text columns for my example project multiple lines of text fields. Set up the list and columns as required then update line 45 in the sample script to change the select query to include the correct project fields you need:

$url = $PWAInstanceURL + "/_api/ProjectServer/Projects(guid'$projectID')/IncludeCustomFields?`$Select=Name,Id,Custom_x005f_4d0daaaba6ade21193f900155d153dd4,Custom_x005f_3f9c814ca2ade21193f900155d153dd4,Custom_x005f_a801708ea5ade21193f900155d153dd4,Custom_x005f_70534c6aa2ade21193f900155d153dd4"

You will at least need to change all of the custom field GUIDs to be the correct GUIDs for your project fields. If you are unsure on how to get the correct custom field GUIDs, see post 2 in the HTML reporting series.

You will then need to update the list item creation part of the sample script to map to the correct SharePoint column names you created and the project fields:

image

Also ensure the variables have been updated correctly, placeholder values seen below:

image

Save and run the PowerShell script (fully test on a non-production PWA site collection before Production) to ensure the data is captured correctly in the target SharePoint list. This script could be run manually on demand or on schedule using a scheduled task if running on a server or a scheduled Azure Function or other methods.

Once the script is run you will see the data in the SharePoint list (data from our sales demo instance):

image

Whilst the purpose of this script was to enable us to get the data easily in Power BI in a such a way that supported refreshing in the Power BI Service, as you can see in the screen shot above, this list includes all of the HTML formatting in a central view – something you can’t get in a PWA Project Center view! Do keep in mind that this SharePoint list would not be security trimmed like a Project Center view though, so you might want to restrict access to the SharePoint list depending on your data / security policies for your PPM data.

Running the script multiple times will create multiple items for each project so you might want to set up grouping on the view or update the script to modify the SharePoint list item with the updated data so that you only have one list item per project.

The script is provided "As is" with no warranties etc.

#SharePoint item count from all lists on all sub webs in SharePoint / #ProjectOnline #PPM #PowerShell

September 28, 2017 at 11:29 am | Posted in Add-on, Administration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, PowerShell, Reporting | Comments Off on #SharePoint item count from all lists on all sub webs in SharePoint / #ProjectOnline #PPM #PowerShell
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This is a supporting blog post for an example PowerShell script I quickly wrote for Microsoft’s Office 365 SharePoint Online. It was created after a query was posted on the Project Online TechNet forums asking how to easily check what sub sites were being used in PWA.

The code sample can be downloaded from here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Get-item-count-from-all-026a6db2

To get the script to work, there will need to be some environment variables set and a DLL available, these are detailed below.

Update the environment details:

image

Add the SharePoint Online / PWA URL, username and password for an account that is a site collection admin on the target site collection.

To get the script to work you will need to reference the DLL as seen in the image below:

image

This can be installed from the SharePoint Online Client components / management shell. I used the dll from the SharePoint Online Management Shell in this example.

Below you can see the output from the PowerShell ISE when running against my test SharePoint / Project Online site collection:

SNAGHTML9ae65556

There are probably easier ways to view this information but I thought I would just try with a simple PowerShell script.

Update for script to report across #ProjectOnline Project Sites for #SharePoint list data #PPM #JavaScript #Office365 #REST #OData

June 3, 2017 at 8:58 pm | Posted in Configuration, Customisation, Fixes, Functionality, Information, Reporting | Comments Off on Update for script to report across #ProjectOnline Project Sites for #SharePoint list data #PPM #JavaScript #Office365 #REST #OData
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I have made a quick change to the example solution starter script to fix a common encoding issue with the EPT names. For example, if your EPT name is “R & D”, the original example solution starter script wouldn’t handle this when querying the Project OData API. It would pass in R & D when querying the OData API but the OData API call fails as it should use R %26 D. I have updated the solution starter code to handle this and encode the EPT name before querying the Project OData API. The solution starter code can be downloaded here:

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Report-on-Online-list-data-f5cbf73f

If you didn’t seen the original post or solution start script before, see the post below:

https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2017/05/05/want-to-report-across-projectonline-project-sites-for-sharepoint-list-data-ppm-javascript-office365-rest-odata/

This script is still a solution starter and should be updated for production use to include the correct data you want, improve error handling, support the REST API pagination, split out HTML, CSS and JavaScript etc.

Want to report across #ProjectOnline Project Sites for #SharePoint list data? #PPM #JavaScript #Office365 #REST #OData

May 5, 2017 at 5:13 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Reporting | 5 Comments
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For those of you that are familiar with Project Server or Project Online, only the default lists and default columns from those lists are synchronised to the database reporting schema. So Project API’s like the OData API (_api/ProjectData) only have data for Risks / Issues and the default columns etc. I have published an example solution starter script that will allow data from any list on the project site to be used.

This is a supporting blog post for the JavaScript solution starter I have published to the Microsoft Gallery, it can be downloaded here:

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Report-on-Online-list-data-f5cbf73f

This solution starter should be updated before production use to include the correct data you want, improve error handling, support the REST API pagination etc. This example uses the Issues list and some example default columns from the Issues list but it can easily be updated to use a custom list on the Project Sites.

There are comments in the script to help update the script for your target Project Site list and columns. Once the script is updated, upload it to a library on the target PWA site. Create a new page on the PWA site to host the JavaScript file. Then add a content editor web part on the new page and reference the JavaScript file, for example:

image

Once added it will look like this (this in on one of my MOD demo tenants):

image

The select menu will contain a list of EPTs:

image

Changing the selection to another EPT will load a SharePoint modal pop up whilst the data loads:

image

If an EPT is selected that doesn’t contain any list items the following will be displayed:

image

There is example conditional formatting on the table:

image

The list item title is a clickable hyper link that will open the list item in a new window:

image

Fully test this on a non-production PWA instance before using in Production, the script is provided As Is with no warranties etc. Try it out and let me know what you think.

Update #ProjectOnline Resource custom field values using #PowerShell with data from #AzureAD user attributes #PPM #Offce365 #ProjectServer #CSOM

November 7, 2016 at 9:40 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, PowerShell, Reporting | Comments Off on Update #ProjectOnline Resource custom field values using #PowerShell with data from #AzureAD user attributes #PPM #Offce365 #ProjectServer #CSOM
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This blog post will demonstrate a simple example of how Microsoft’s PPM tool, Project Online, can include / sync metadata from Azure AD user attributes to resource custom fields in Project Online. This example script will update the resource custom field “Job Title” on my test tenant with the data from the Azure AD user “Title” attribute.

This script example can be downloaded here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Update-Online-Resource-83137b7f

The script does require some additional modules / DLLs to work. Firstly you will need the Azure AD module installed, this can be downloaded here: http://connect.microsoft.com/site1164/Downloads/DownloadDetails.aspx?DownloadID=59185. You will also need the SharePoint Online and Project Online CSOM DLLs. The DLL’s used are from the NuGet package here: https://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.SharePointOnline.CSOM/16.1.5521.1200. There are later version available, check here: https://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.SharePointOnline.CSOM. Download those as required. These modules can be seen here on line 3,5 and 14 in the example script, the location will need to be updated to reference the correct location for your SP / PS Online CSOM DLLs.

The user setting up the script will need to update the correct location to the DLLs required, the AD username, AD password, CSV file location, PWA instance URL, username, password and the custom field internal name. The PWA account specified will need edit access to all of the resources in PWA and the AD account will need access to read all the users in Azure AD. Ensure the variables have been updated correctly, placeholder values seen below:

image_thumb.png

In this example all users in the Azure AD will be exported, clearly if you have a large organisation it would be efficient the filter for only those users that exist in Project Online. The code matches users and resources based on the AD display name and PWA resource name when updating the resources in PWA.

To get the correct custom field internal ID I use the REST API, <PWA Site URL> + /_api/ProjectServer/CustomFields. Find the resource level custom field and copy the InternalName as seen below:

image_thumb.png

Once the PowerShell script has been updated, save it and it can then be tested on a test / non-production environment. Once executed in PowerShell, each resource found in the CSV file will be outputted as seen in the example below. In this example there are many AD users in the CSV export that do not exist in the PWA instance.

image_thumb.png

Checking in the Resource Center after the script has run you can see for the resources that exist in the CSV file created, the Job Title has been updated with the values found in Azure AD / the export CSV file:

image_thumb.png

The CSV file generated can be seen here:

image_thumb.png

This PowerShell script could be run on a schedule from a server on-prem or even in Azure / webjob. The script would just need access to save / access a CSV file and the DLLs / modules required. Fully test this script on a test / non-production PWA instance before running on a Production PWA instance.

The script is provided “As is” with no warranties etc.

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