#ProjectOnline #PowerApps example #Office365 #PPM #PMOT #Apps #MSProject #SharePoint Part2

February 24, 2018 at 10:17 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, App, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Mobile | 2 Comments
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In part 2 of this series we look at continuing with the example PowerApp for Project Online for project details and project navigation. For those of you that missed part 1, a link to the post can be found below:

https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/02/21/projectonline-powerapps-example-office365-ppm-pmot-apps-msproject-part1/

In part 2 we will update the detail screen to display the data we want and include links to PWA for the associated project. If you are following, open the app you started in part 1:

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Using the tree view on the left, click DetailScreen1 to load the detail screen or click the chevron next to a project from the browse screen:

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Firstly I updated the screen label to “Project Details” and deleted the delete and edit icons:

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Next two buttons were added to the top bar, one for the Site and one for the Tasks. The Site button will launch DataCardValue8 which in my case is the Project Site URL as seen below:

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The Tasks button will launch the Project Schedule PDP but concatenating the PWA URL for the schedule PDP (or whatever PDP you want to link to) then using the ProjectID, in my case DataCardValue2, from the detail screen for the projuid URL parameter:

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The buttons were added to the screen using the insert menu:

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As you can see, there are lots of options on the insert ribbon! Other quick links could easily be added such as Issues, Risks, New Risk etc. That is it for the detail view, we have some project details and two buttons that link out to PWA for the associated project:

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Just for fun I also added a new screen in for a chart. I inserted a bar chart and created a project count by progress chart:

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For the Items, I entered the following formula to count the number of projects Completed, Not Starter or In Progress:

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The formula is below for my data, ProjectData is the name of my SharePoint list and Progress is the column on my SharePoint list that contains the % complete value for each project:

Table(
    {Column: "Completed", Value: CountIf(ProjectData, Progress = 100)
    },
    {Column: "Not Started", Value: CountIf(ProjectData, Progress = 0)
    },
    {Column: "In Progress", Value: CountIf(ProjectData, Progress <> 0 && Progress <> 100)
    }
)

Then set the item colours:

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I then added the back arrow to navigate back to the main browse screen:

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The final change was to add an icon to the main browse screen that enabled navigation to the chart screen:

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To preview your app in PowerApps, press F5:

Main screen: list of projects with search and sort using project name, link for each project to project detail screen, access to chart screen, refresh the data and link to create a new project in Project Online

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Details screen: project details with button links to the project site or schedule PDP in Project Online PWA and a back button to the main screen

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Chart screen: bar chart display project count by progress for Completed, Not Started and In Progress with a back button to the main screen

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Once you are happy with your app you can share it to your organisation. Before you do, access the App Settings view and give it a name, set the icon and description:

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Then click Save and save it to your organisations PowerApps environment then share the app:

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For details on Saving, publishing and sharing your apps see the links here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powerapps/save-publish-app & https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powerapps/share-app Users can then access your app using the browser, PowerApps Studio or the PowerApps mobile app!

Hopefully that has given you enough to get started or given you some ideas for Project Online PowerApps. There are so many features to PowerApps, they are very powerful! For getting started guides on PowerApps start here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powerapps/getting-started

Have fun!

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#ProjectOnline #PowerApps example #Office365 #PPM #PMOT #Apps #MSProject Part1

February 21, 2018 at 11:47 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, App, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information, Mobile | 3 Comments
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PowerApps aren’t a new feature in Office 365 but not one that I have blogged about before, mainly due to the lack of native support for Project Online, but I have created apps before using PowerApps  – it’s an awesome application! PowerApps provide a great way for users to create powerful business apps without writing code. You can use the same connectors that have use for Flow etc. so there is great support for SharePoint Online but no so much for Project Online. There is a connector in preview but it doesn’t return the properties I needed for this example. To get around this, the easiest approach is to have your Project Online data in a SharePoint list, I have covered a few examples with code samples before:

https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2018/01/27/projectonline-project-level-html-fields-to-a-sharepoint-list-powershell-ppm-office365/

https://pwmather.wordpress.com/2016/08/26/projectonline-data-capture-snapshot-capability-with-powershell-sharepoint-office365-ppm-bi/

In this series of posts, we will create a simple navigation type app for Project Online using PowerApps. In part 1 we look at getting started and creating / updating the browse / home screen. To do this we will need the Project Online data in a SharePoint list using a similar process as the examples above. This post assumes you already have your Project Online data available in a SharePoint Online list and a process to keep this updated as your Project Online changes, similar to the list below:

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Access PowerApps from the Office 365 app launcher:

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This will launch PowerApps:

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If you haven’t used SharePoint Online in Flow or PowerApps before, firstly you will need to click Connections > New Connections > Type SharePoint in the Search bar and add the SharePoint connection:

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Once you have the connection you can create the app. To create the PowerApp you can either use the web based PowerApps Studio that can be accessed on the Apps page:

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Or there is an App available in the Microsoft Store:

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For the purpose of this blog post I will be using the Windows 10 App but the steps are the same.

Once the App launches, you can Open existing apps:

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Or create a new one, click the New button:

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From here you can create an app starting with your data, start from a blank canvas or start from a template. The templates options will present you with template previews to select from:

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For the purpose of the this blog post and to keep the blog post shorter, we will start with our SharePoint data, if this is your first PowerApp this might be the best option to start with until you’re familiar with PowerApps:

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Type the URL of the site that contains the list:

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Press Go then select the correct list and press Connect, in this example it is ProjectData:

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PowerApps will then build a working app for you based on the data in your SharePoint list:

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Once finished, home / browse screen is displayed:

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Clicking the chevron for a project loads the detail screen:

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That might be good enough for some scenarios – pretty awesome given it was a click of a button! As mentioned, we will look to make a navigation type app that displays some high level project information so we will make some minor tweaks to the base app PowerApps kindly created for us.

Clicking on different areas on the canvas will enable different settings or you can click the elements using the left hand tree view. The first item we will change is the ProjectData label which by default takes the source list name. This property is the LblAppName1:

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Moving down the screen, we want to change the search feature so that the search box and sorting work on the Project Name. To do this, select BrowseGallery1 from the left hand tree view, then click Advanced, finally update the Data items. Replace ComplianceAssetId with Title as seen below in two places:

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The search box and sort icon will now work on the Project Name – in our case this is Title on the source SharePoint list.

Next up we want to see Project Name and Project Owner on the project summary section. Using the left hand tree view, click Title1 then access the Advanced menu. In the DATA section under the Text property, update this to “ThisItem.Title”:

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Notice the Project Name now appears. Repeat for Subtitle1 and select a different project property or multiple properties, I will set the Project Owner and % complete:

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I will also change the Body1 property to display the Project Start and Finish Dates:

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The final change for the browse screen in part 1 of this blog post is to change the IconNewItem1, this is the + symbol in the top right corner. In the default app, this will load the edit screen to create a new list item, for this example we will point this to load the create project page in Project Online. Select the IconNewItem1 from the left hand tree view, replace the OnSelect “NewForm(EditForm1;Navigate(EditScreen1, None) with Launch(https://PWASiteURL/_layouts/15/PWA/Wizards/CreateProject.aspx) and update the tooltip as seen below:

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The browse screen should look something like this now:

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With the ability to search and sort on Project Name:

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Worth noting is that this project data will not be security trimmed etc.

We have barely touched the surface of PowerApps but that is it for Part 1. In Part 2 we look at updating the detail view and adding in links to navigate to the project in PWA.

#ProjectServer and #SharePoint 2013 / 2016 February 2018 Cumulative Update #PS2013 #SP2013 #PS2016 #SP2016 #MSProject

February 14, 2018 at 7:39 am | Posted in Administration, CU, Fixes, Functionality, Information, Installation | Comments Off on #ProjectServer and #SharePoint 2013 / 2016 February 2018 Cumulative Update #PS2013 #SP2013 #PS2016 #SP2016 #MSProject
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The Office 2016 February 2018 updates and cumulative updates are now available, please see the links below:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/4077965

Project 2016 February 2018 update:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/4011672

SharePoint Server 2016 / Project Server 2016 February 2018 update: 
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/4011680

The Office 2013 February 2018 updates and cumulative updates are now available, please see the links below:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/4077965

Project Server 2013 February 2018 CU Server Roll up package:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/4011694

Project Server 2013 February 2018 update:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/4011701

Project 2013 February 2018 update:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/4011679

Also worth noting, if you haven’t done so already, install Service Pack 1 http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/2880556 first if installing the February 2018 CU for 2013.

As always, fully test these updates on a replica test environment before deploying to production.

#MicrosoftForms and #MicrosoftFlow for #ProjectOnline #PPM project reviews #O365 #SharePoint #PMOT

February 11, 2018 at 10:47 pm | Posted in Add-on, Administration, Configuration, Customisation, Functionality, Information | Comments Off on #MicrosoftForms and #MicrosoftFlow for #ProjectOnline #PPM project reviews #O365 #SharePoint #PMOT
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Most projects at some point have some kind of review such as a stakeholder review or project closure review. As Project Online is built on SharePoint there are many ways that this can be achieved but in this blog post we will look at making use of Microsoft Forms to design those reviews, Microsoft Flow to capture the responses for the reviews and SharePoint Online to store the data in a list in the Project Web App site collection. As Project Online is built in the Microsoft Office 365 cloud there are lots of great features that you can make use of, Forms seemed a good fit for a project review.

Firstly access https://forms.office.com/ to get started with your review form. Please note Forms is currently in Preview. Click the New Form button:

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This will load the form designer:

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You can use the Theme button to select a theme or upload your own:

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Enter a form title and description:

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Then click the Add question button:

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Select the type of response your question requires, notice the two additional options on the ellipsis at the end. Depending on the type of question selected, that will determine the control used on the form. Design the form as required, for this blog post, here is my very simple form:

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Now on my Project Online PWA site in SharePoint Online I have created a list that contains columns for each of my questions:

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The next step is to access Microsoft Flow and click create from template:

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This blog post assumes you have already set up the connection to your SharePoint Online tenant in Microsoft Flow.

Search for forms and the existing templates for Forms will be loaded:

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For this example we just need the first one “Record form responses in SharePoint”, click Continue:

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Give the Flow a name then select the correct form in the “When a new response is submitted” Flow action:

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Then again in the “Get response details” Flow action:

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Then select / type / paste the SharePoint site URL and select the list created in the “Create item” Flow action:

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Then map the responses from the form to the SharePoint list columns in the “Create item” Flow action:

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Save the Flow.

Now back in Forms, access the Form then click the ellipsis then Settings:

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On the form settings, set who can respond to the form, in this example I only want people in my organisation to response and I set it to record their name:

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Now click the Share button to get the form URL to send to the relevant users or add in the Project Web App site. For example, if you were creating a project closure review form or stakeholder review form you might add this to a certain Project Detail Page that is only visible at a certain stage of the project lifecycle.

Once users respond you will see the flow runs in the run history and you will also see the responses on the target SharePoint list. See some example responses below:

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Do be aware of the SharePoint list access – you might want to restrict access to this list!

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