Check server times for #SharePoint / #ProjectServer farms #PS2010 #SP2010 #MSProject #PowerShell

April 13, 2012 at 4:40 pm | Posted in Administration, Installation, Performance, PowerShell | 2 Comments
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For a server farm it is important that all server times are in sync, for Project Server this is key. For example if the Application server has a different time to the SQL server you might see jobs in the Project Server queue that are in sleeping state. A useful PowerShell script to check all of the server times in the SharePoint farm can be seen below:

The script can be downloaded from the script center here:

http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/Check-server-time-for-all-76fdd4c0

#Script needs to be run on a SharePoint server
#Run script with account that has admin access to all servers
Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -EA 0
$servers = (Get-SPServer) | foreach {$_.Address}

foreach($server in $servers)
{

$time = Get-WmiObject Win32_LocalTime -computer $server  -EA 0

$hour = $time.Hour
$minute = $time.Minute
$second = $time.Second
Write-Host “$server current time is $hour : $minute : $second”

}
Write-host “If the server times are not in sync please adjust the time settings. Press any key to continue”
$null = $host.UI.RawUI.ReadKey(“NoEcho,IncludeKeyDown”)

An example output can be seen below:

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#ProjectServer 2010 and #SharePoint 2010 performance analysis using PAL #paltool #PowerShell #PS2010 #SP2010 #Windows

March 21, 2012 at 4:12 pm | Posted in Administration, Performance, PowerShell | 2 Comments
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A really useful tool for analysing Performance Counter logs is PAL – Performance Analysis of Logs.

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This is primarily a PowerShell tool with a GUI interference available to download from CodePlex:http://pal.codeplex.com/. The tool can be used to generate your Perfmon Templates, then to analyse the logs and create a nice HTML report output.

A quick overview of the tool and usage for monitoring Project Server can be found below.

From the Welcome tab switch to the Threshold tab as shown below:

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There are preconfigured Threshold files including one specifically for Project Server. In this example I have created a custom threshold file that includes Project Server, IIS and SP2010:

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Now export the threshold file out to a Perfmon template:

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Now load the Performance Monitor and expand Data Collection Sets, right click on User Defined > New > Data Collection Set.

Give the data set a name and check the radio button “Create from template”

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Click Next then Browse:

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Navigate to the location of the new Template created earlier and open the template:

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Click Finish. The new data collection set will appear under User defined.

Start the new data collection set when you are ready to monitor the performance counters:

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Once the monitoring session has completed stop the data collection:

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Now load PAL and click on the Counter Log tab and add the output file (blg file) from the counters data collection:

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Now click on the Questions tab and answer the questions listed. Once answered, click on the Output Options tab and set the analysis interval, in this example I have left it to auto:

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Now access the File Output tab to set the output directory and the chosen output format and file name:

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Clicking on the Queue tab will display the variables used for the PowerShell script:

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Click on the Execute tab and click Finish to Execute now:

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The log will now be processed and generate the report:

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Once completed the report will load in Internet Explorer:

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Thanks to my colleague Chris Stretton who gave me a demo of this tool. For an excellent description of the options available on the GUI interface see Chris’s post here:

http://spchris.com/2012/03/20/analysing-performance-using-pal/

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